Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology

Research Profiles

Here we present a few of Uppsala University’s prominent researchers and the people behind the research.

Our Nobel Laureates and most influential scientists

Four Nobel prizes – two in physics and two in chemistry – have been awarded to scientists from Uppsala University within the Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology. The Svedberg, Professor of Physical Chemistry, received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1926. He constructed the first ultracentrifuge for determining the size and form of various macromolecules, a separation method that has been of immense value to biochemistry and molecular biology. Manne Siegbahn, Professor of Physics, introduced modern nuclear physics to Sweden. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1924 for his contributions to X-ray spectroscopy. Arne Tiselius, Uppsala’s first Professor of Biochemistry, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1948. The method he divised, electrophoresis of protein, played a major role in establishing Uppsala as a leader in biochemical separation methods. Kai Siegbahn, Professor of Physics (son of Manne Siegbahn) received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1981. His work in high-resolution electron spectroscopy provided an important analytical method for studying the effects of chemical binding.

In addition to the Nobel Prize laureates, some of our best known historic scientists are Carl von Linné, Olof Rudbeck and Anders Celsius. Read more about natural scientists in 18th-century Uppsala.

Celsius-Linné Lectures

The faculty arranges Celsius-Linné Lectures in commemoration of Anders Celsius and Carl von Linnaeus. The selected lecturers are highly acclaimed and internationally well-known scientists